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Lessons from Literature
 
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About the Program

Inside Lessons from Literature

There’s no doubt that teachers across the country are aware of the pervasiveness and seriousness of abuse and violence among teenagers in the U.S. today. Until now, there hasn't been a program that takes this real-life issue and links it to common themes in much of the material being taught in English classrooms today.

We identified a tremendous opportunity to equip teachers with a program that empowers them to become even greater ambassadors for change. If teachers can shape the way young people think and act today, the social norms that currently perpetuate violence can be extinguished tomorrow.

The Lessons from Literature program was designed to extend and enrich your core literature curriculum while raising student awareness of the serious topic of abuse.

To help you learn about and integrate the program into your existing curriculum, Lessons from Literature offers:

  • Background information, fact sheets and other resources to help you prepare to teach the program.
     
  • Lesson plans that are aligned with NCTE’s National Standards for the English Language Arts that address themes of power, control, abuse and respect.
     
  • A Lesson Template to help you design or modify your own literature lessons around the themes of abuse.
     
  • An online, searchable Resource Library of books that tie into the themes of abuse, as well as movies, documents, plays and songs.
     
  • An online Teaching Community where you can share lessons, ideas and experiences using the program.
     
  • Professional development opportunities to learn and work with other teachers to prevent teen relationship abuse.

With Lessons from Literature, teachers inspire youth to think and act differently about relationships and their lives.

 



     

"15.5 million U.S. children live in families in homes where there is violence."

–Journal of Family Psychology